Good First Impressions Are Important for Organizations

First Impressions
Image: entrepreneur.com

The founder and president of Organizational Sustainability Consulting, Dr. Ari Betof advises senior nonprofit executives on institutional effectiveness. Recently, Dr. Ari Betof published an article that discusses the importance of first impressions from an organization point of view.

First impressions matter. This applies to interactions between humans and interactions between a human and an organization. From the moment a client begins interacting with an organization, he or she forms an impression of it.

Large institutions may have difficulty cultivating positive first impressions between their employees and clients. However, the Boston College (BC) Cadigan Alumni Center has excelled at creating good first impressions.

When people enter the alumni center, the first person they meet is Maureen McGrail, BC’s Director of First Impressions. McGrail’s title is the result of the college’s intentions to build a joyful work culture that recognizes employees and builds engagement. This environment helps create a positive first impression of BC.

Published by aribetof

Ari Betof is a senior leader and management consultant with 15+ years of experience building sustainable organizations and maximizing revenue growth. He leverages a combination of expertise in organizational stewardship and transferable skills such as principal gift fundraising, quantitative analysis, and strategic planning to drive mission-aligned, high-impact change. Ari is an agile, savvy, and emotionally intelligent partner who achieves results, builds trusting relationships, develops others, and creates scalable systems. He thrives in high-pressure, complex environments while bringing together diverse sets of stakeholders. Core competencies include: • Building high performing teams • Leadership development • Executive coaching • Organizational effectiveness • Change management • Strategic planning and implementation • Business development • Fundraising • Quantitative analysis

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